PBA Home Peacock Bass Fishing Forum Forum Index Register FAQ Memberlist Search

Peacock Bass Fishing Forum Forum Index » Fishing Tactics and Tackle » Perseverance Pays Off
Post new topic  Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic 
Perseverance Pays Off 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:33 am Reply with quote
Larry Larsen
Executive Director
Joined: 28 Dec 2004
Posts: 608
Location: Lakeland, FL
Many of us have made repeated casts to a great-looking spot and finally enticed a strike from a giant. Quite often, I've spent 5 minutes or more tossing to a place like the mouth of a small cut or a beautiful point with nice drop on one side. If I see evidence of a "teener" in such a spot, I will cast to it at least 10 or 15 times and then toss another 10 or 20 casts toward it.

With guide insight and his insistence on more repeated casts, I will "stay with the program". Once my guide and I noticed a giant boil on a baitfish beside a great looking, deep water sandbar island near the mouth of a lagoon that we were in and fishing 200 yards away. We immediately used our trolling motor on high to get us within casting distance and my partner and I pelted the edges of the 30-foot long sand island.

After 30 casts each and 10 minutes of tossing and ripping our big topwater tail spinner plugs, my partner became irritated and wanted to move on. After another 30 casts with a variety of lures and 10 more minutes with no further sign of the monster fish, I was ready to move on into the lagoon and look at new water. But ... our guide was insistent. He kept motioning for us to continue our casting to the sandy island. He was not moving!

We were both upset with him at that point. My partner put his rod down, but I kept tossing. About 10 minutes later, I hooked an 18 pounder on my big topwater plug. The guide then slowly motored on back deeper into the lagoon.

We can debate the reasons why it took 30 minutes to entice that fish to strike again and I have my theories. But now, let us hear of your "perservering payoffs" on giant peacock bass. Share such an experience with us please.


Last edited by Larry Larsen on Sat May 01, 2010 11:26 am; edited 1 time in total

_________________
Larry Larsen
Executive Director
Peacock Bass Association
www.peacockbassassociation
www.larsenoutdoors.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 6:46 am Reply with quote
Dink Alston
Joined: 09 Dec 2005
Posts: 141
Location: Belle Glade, FL
Larry,

I have mixed feelings about this type of approach. Who's to say that the 30 minutes you spent enticing that fish wouldn't have yielded something better inside the lagoon or at another spot. I don't always have the patience to keep pounding after one fish. If it's a good day and the fishing has been good, I'd probably move on after about 10 minutes.

If it was one of those very slow days, then yes, I probably would keep working that spot for the fish. I trust most of the guides when they want me to do this as they've shown me over and over again that they see things I don't. I've lost count of the times a guide had me cast to a certain spot telling me there was a fish there, and I could see no sign of it, but caught the fish.

Dink
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 6:40 pm Reply with quote
AndrewTaylor
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 39
Location: Minneapolis, MN
You can add "patience" too. I once read about the tactic of throwing out a surface lure near some structure and just leave it sit still for 15-30 seconds or so. Not being the patient type, I never tried it until I saw this tactic work to perfection, albeit unintentionally. I was fishing with a buddy who cast out his Zara near some submerged logs. I had already hit that spot, so I wasn't paying very close attention. My buddies thumb slipped and he ended up with a big rats nest of a back lash. While he fixed this, his lure sat for several minutes by the logs. Finally he was "back in business" and he reeled in the slack. The moment his lure twitched as the line was being reeled in, a 15lb peacock (the biggest of the day) slammed his lure. I wonder how long it was looking at the lure? How many times have we cast to a location, and reeled in the lure before the inquisitive fish has had time to come over and check out the "splash" of the lure landing in the water. Something to think about...

_________________
Andrew Taylor
LurePartsOnline.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 8:58 pm Reply with quote
AndrewTaylor
Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 39
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Here is a situation I have encountered twice. Have you ever fished a body of water that seems like it should be prime peacock territory and had little or no action? On my last trip, the guides said they knew of a "good" lagoon at the end of a chain of lakes. Three boats headed there and when we arrived, we spread out to fish the lake, one boat going down one side, another down the other and one down the middle. After an hour and a couple of trips up and down with no action, one boat headed out and we were getting ready to follow. On our last trip to the far end of the lake, we finally had our first sign of a peacock, with a missed strike. On the trip back we had some other fish hit, but none of them peacock. About 100yds from the exit, we spotted the second boat preparing to head out. We motored over toward them and trolled that section for the heck of it. Just as we were about to reel in to leave, my son hooked into a 13 pounder (his biggest of the trip thus far). The other boat saw this, but it wasn't enough to make them stay. They left and we decided to make one more pass up and down the lake, this time trolling. It was a completely different lake! Action was so fast and heavy we couldn't believe it! We hooked a dozen teeners and countless smaller (6 - 10lbs) in the space of 2 hrs. The fish had suddenly turned ON! Places where we had no action a half hour earlier seemed to be teeming with big hungry peacock on a feeding frenzy. WOW! I'm not certain what caused this change, but I think it could be several things. One, when you troll and make noise, you attract attention. When you finally hook a peacock, maybe the commotion flips a switch. I know that once entering a small lake via a channel, we "herded" a group of baitfish into the lake and started a wild feeding frenzy in front of our eyes. But I recommend not leaving a lake too soon. Make sure you've tried everything and made some "noise" on your way out. I've even thought of making some loud splashing noises with a paddle to see if fish turn on. Especially in those places I know should hold fish and haven't seen any action after a half hour or 45 min. In this case and a couple of others, our persistence paid off big time. I've been on the losing end of that too, leaving an area that turned on shortly after and missed out on the catch. Just something to remember next time you are there...

_________________
Andrew Taylor
LurePartsOnline.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:39 am Reply with quote
Larry Larsen
Executive Director
Joined: 28 Dec 2004
Posts: 608
Location: Lakeland, FL
Great anecdotes Andrew. I've trolled out of a lagoon several times after fishing it "throughly" by casting both the shoreline and center (to no avail), and had a big fish strike as I am ready to reel in the final time. I'd turn around and keep trolling for more and catch a bunch, usually large peacocks. I think the chances of trolling up a teener are much better when the little peacocks are not biting. They are in the "hide" mode and inactive. Trolling also puts your lure in slightly deeper waters where the majority of giants lurk!

Also, another story about a giant peacock waiting to strike something motionless. I was fishing a lagoon from the back of a boat and noticed a 12-inch long baitfish floating on the surface near a laydown on a bar in fairly deep water. I knew something big was probably underneath it looking up. I cast a large topwater plug repeatedly to that dead forage. I used a normal cadence retrieve, a fast jerk-pause retrieve, a slow one, and even a "cast and let it sit 2-feet away for 45 seconds" retrieve. Nothing. I had the guide stop so that I could make about 45 casts of varying retrieves (and different lure types) to the dead fish and my partner had loss his patience. So I gave up and we started moving away via the electric motor.

Then the loudest "crash" sound from the biggest peacock ever happened when the baitfish dissappeared in a "barrel" of spray. Of course, we turned around and both of us peppered the area with a variety of lures. But, that giant fish was nowhere to be found.

_________________
Larry Larsen
Executive Director
Peacock Bass Association
www.peacockbassassociation
www.larsenoutdoors.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Perseverance Pays Off 
  Peacock Bass Fishing Forum Forum Index » Fishing Tactics and Tackle
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
All times are GMT - 5 Hours  
Page 1 of 1  

  
  
 Post new topic  Reply to topic  


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2004 phpBB Group |© 2004 Trushkin.net